Tag Archives: Science fiction

Pawn review

Pawn (The Blackcoat Rebellion, #1)Pawn by Aimee Carter

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Pawn is just another YA dystopian novel. If you’re really into this genre then it is worth a read. I read so many great reviews of this novel but for me it just didn’t have that wow factor. In fact, there were several aspects that got on my nerves.

Pawn is set in an American meritocracy where at seventeen, citizens are required to undertake an aptitude test. This test determines their social ranking and job. With shadows of Soylent Green but a little bit more tasteful, overpopulation is curbed by sending the infirmed, elderly and excess children to Elsewhere. The concept of Elsewhere had too many holes for me and it wasn’t really explained well. There is only so much hunting that the politicians can do!

The protagonist, Kitty, has undiagnosed dyslexia. This is why she performs poorly on the aptitude test. If this novel is supposed to be able the inequity in our schooling system and society for people with learning disorders or disabilities – it fall falls dramatically short. It also seems to waver between supporting and destroying the meritocracy. The only strong message was anti monarchy. I’m really confused about what Carter was trying to convey. Most successful dystopian novels have a clear message for society to act upon – I don’t think it was there.

The huge issue I had with Pawn was the title. There were two tacked on references to chess. They really stuck out. If the Harts had actually been a monarchy, perhaps it would have worked better. In my opinion the metaphor of the pawn failed. The other issue I had with this novel was the sheer amount of dialogue. If it is made into a film, the screen writer will have an easy job. I know the old adage of show don’t tell but sometimes paraphrasing can save ten pages!

Some people have really liked this novel. I thought it was ok. I think if you’re a fan of the genre then you should read it and form your own conclusion. I doubt that I will read the rest of the series.

View all my reviews

1 Comment

Filed under Advance Reading Copy, Young Adult fiction

Fast Money review

Fast Money: A Shelby Nichols Adventure (Shelby Nichols #2)Fast Money: A Shelby Nichols Adventure by Colleen Helme

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

This series would make a great present for my mother. I’m finding it harder and harder to find things to read that my mother would also enjoy. I hate that awkward feeling I get when she asks me what I’m reading and if she can read it when I’m done. Fast Money has everything she enjoys in a story – a relatable female protagonist, minimal explicit language, a bit of humour to keep it light, implied violence, a mystery to follow, and no graphic sex scenes – WINNER!

Fast Money has just enough humour to balance with the mystery to make this a great holiday read. The protagonist is a mother and wife. Such a different sleuth from what I usually read. I think I would enjoy this series more my children were a little older so I could empathise with Shelby more.

I hadn’t read the first book so some parts were a bit confusing. I suggest reading the synopsis of the first book, Carrots, before reading Fast Money. There were a lot of characters and at times I was confused with who was who but a strong series needs a range allies and villains. You do need to suspend belief a little bit to truly engage with this series. I found that there was quite a bit of repetition in the novel due to its stream of consciousness style. This is good if you like to read small passages over a period of time or if you often put a book down and come back to it later.

I read the audiobook edition. I really liked the narrator. She really embodied the character of Shelby. Fast Money is written from Shelby’s perspective in almost a stream of consciousness style. Through Shelby we hear what the other characters are thinking, this meant that while the narrate or differentiated character voices, she didn’t attempt any rediculous accents – YAY!

There are several plot lines that intersect in interesting ways. The novel’s conclusion sets it a promising premise for the rest of the series

Next time I’m looking for a holiday read, I will pick up the next one.

View all my reviews

1 Comment

Filed under Audiobook, Mystery

All Our Yesterdays

All Our YesterdaysAll Our Yesterdays by Cristin Terrill

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

All Our Yesterdays is one of the best time travel stories that I have read. There are a few twists and turns in the plot and at times I wasn’t sure who I wanted to succeed. This is a well written and satisfying story. The resolution is really well done and leaves you feeling contented when you finally turn that last page.

Usually, I really don’t like time travel stories but All Our Yesterdays isn’t your typical time travel story. It really appealed to me and often after I had put the book down, I wondered what I would do if I had the technology to go back in time.

The characterisation was well portrayed. The chapters were written from different character perspectives and Cristin Terrill was able to successfully differentiate between the characters by giving them their own authentic voice. This isn’t easy to achieve so it is a huge kudos from me to any author who is able to pull it off.

This story is about choices, responsibilities, relationships and consequences. It stays with you and challenges you to think about your own choices and your impact on the future of our planet. So many times it provokes you to think about “What would you do?”

Even if you are not a fan of Science Fiction, if you are a lover of Young Adult fiction – read All Our Yesterdays.

Happy reading 🙂 

 

View all my reviews

Leave a comment

Filed under Advance Reading Copy, Young Adult fiction

Feed by M. T. Anderson

FeedFeed by M.T. Anderson

3.5 stars

Feed establishes an intricate and believable future world where technology and corporations dictate the lives or Americans while the world’s natural habit is quietly destroyed.

M. T. Anderson successful achieves an integrated vernacular littered with jargon and slang that enhances the narrative rather than distracts from it. Each word in this sociolect is used without the explanation that other authors feel is necessary. The language is easily understood through its use in the context.

The first few chapters had be enthralled. Actually, the first lines peaked my interest: “We went to the moon to have fun, but the moon turned out to completely suck.” However, as the story progressed and turned into a more serious commentary on consumerism, technology and environmental destruction, I became less involved.

Even though, Feed is one of those novels that all teenagers should read.

View all my reviews

Leave a comment

Filed under Audiobook, Young Adult fiction

These Broken Stars

These Broken Stars (Starbound, #1)These Broken Stars by Amie Kaufman and Meagan Spooner

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

These Broken Stars, co-written by Amie Kaufman and Meagan Spooner is a perfect bridge into science fiction for lovers of paranormal romance and fantasy, like me It is one of those stories where you sit down and think ‘I’ll just finish this chapter’. The next thing you know, three hours and ten chapters have just disappeared. This is just what I needed to read this week – a book I could lose myself in.

Set in a futuristic universe, where cross-dimensional travel is the norm, Lilac, only daughter of the richest man, and Tarver, a decorated soldier, find themselves crashed on a planet. Together they must survive long enough to be rescued.

Kaufman and Spooner affectively use foreshadowing at the beginning of each chapter by flashing forward to Tarver’s interview after the rescue. Surprisingly, this adds to the reader’s desire to keep reading rather than acting as a ‘spoiler’.

There Broken Stars examines, without conclusions, what it means to be you. I wasn’t expecting this existential discussion on ‘who am I?’ while reading the novel. Am I my memories? Am I my body? Am I the combination of both? An interesting twist.

A story of love, class distinction, survival and identity that is well worth a read. Check out the first installment in the Starbound trilogy, These Broken Stars.

View all my reviews

 

4 Comments

Filed under Advance Reading Copy, Young Adult fiction

Science fiction – a growing love

For a long time I believed that I hated science fiction and I wouldn’t even give it a chance. However, after taking on a science fiction project in 2011 as part of my Masters degree, I have started to explore the genre more and more. Guess what I have found? There are some fantastic science fiction stories out there that are a far cry from my stereotypical assumptions of what is science fiction.

I know I’m not the only one. When The Hunger Games was at the height of popularity, many of my students were disgruntled to be informed that The Hunger Games was a science fiction novel. They were happy enough when we studied the subgenre of dystopian fiction because they too did not consider themselves to be science fiction readers.

Some of the great science fiction titles I have read in the last couple of years include:

Juno Of Taris Juno of Taris by Fleur Beale

These Broken Stars (Starbound, #1) These Broken Stars by Amie kaufman and Meagan Spooner

Divergent (Divergent, #1) Divergent by Veronica Roth

Delirium (Delirium, #1) Delirium by Lauren Oliver

Partials (Partials, #1) Partials by Dan Wells

Audiobooks
Metatropolis META-tropolis

As you can see, my science fiction tastes aren’t very varied … yet.

Recommend me some of your favourite or most interesting science fiction titles.

Happy reading 🙂
 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Personal